Latest book from Word Cloud Classics

Leaves of Grass

A timeless collection of hundreds of poems that resonate to the American spirit.  

Leaves of Grass is a timeless collection of poems and essays penned by influential nineteenth-century writer Walt Whitman. This profound compilation explores topics such as nature, mysticism, mortality, transcendentalism, and democracy. Inspired by personal experiences and observations, Whitman spent almost four decades piecing together the complete work, sharing societal ideals and epiphanies about life that still resonate with readers today. This edition of the complete Leaves of Grass also includes Whitman’s preface to the original 1855 edition, in which he expounds on his personal philosophy of writing poetry, and an introduction by scholar Kenneth C. Mondschein.
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About the Authors

Aesop

Aesop was a fabulist or story teller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains uncertain and (if they ever existed) no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics.

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Dante Alighieri

Durante degli Alighieri, known as Dante (1265–1321), was a major Italian poet of the Middle Ages. His Divine Comedy is widely considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature

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Hans Christian Andersen

One of the most prolific and beloved writers of all time, Danish poet and author Hans Christian Andersen is best known for his fairy tales. Born in Odense, Denmark, in 1805, Andersen published his first story at 17. In all, he wrote more than 150 stories before his death in 1875.

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Jane Austen

Born December 16, 1775, Jane Austen is one of the most celebrated authors of the English language. Her fiction is known for its witty satires on English society. Austen wrote anonymously during her life and wasn't widely recognized as a great English writer until after her death in 1817.

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J. M. Barrie

J. M. Barrie (1860–1937) was a Scottish author and dramatist, best remembered today as the creator of Peter Pan.

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L. Frank Baum

L. Frank Baum (May 15, 1856 - May 6, 1919) was a US author, poet, playwright, actor, and independent filmmaker best known today as the creator - along with illustrator WW Denslow - of one of the most popular books in U.S. children's literature: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. He wrote thirteen sequels, nine other fantasy novels, and a plethora of other works, including 55 novels, 82 short stories, and over 200 poems.

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William Blake

William Blake (1757–1827) was an English poet and artist and one of the most important members of the Romantic movement.

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Charlotte Brontë

Charlotte Brontë was born in 1816 in Yorkshire and died in 1855. She was the third of six children and the oldest of the three well-known novelist and poet Brontë sisters. Brontë published several novels; however Jane Eyre remains her most famous literary work.

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Thomas Bulfinch

Thomas Bulfinch was an American writer born in Newton, Massachusetts.

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Frances Hodgson Burnett

Frances Hodgson Burnett (November 24, 1849 – October 29, 1924) was an English playwright and author. She is best known for her children's stories, in particular The Secret Garden (published in 1911), A Little Princess (published in 1905), and Little Lord Fauntleroy (published in 1885-6). She was born in Cheetham, England and in 1865 emigrated to the United States, settling near Knoxville, Tennessee.

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Edgar Rice Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs was an American writer, best known for his creations of the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter.

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George Gordon Byron

George Gordon Byron (1788–1824), commonly known as Lord Byron, was an English poet and a leading figure in the Romantic movement.

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Lewis Carroll

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and a photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the Snark" and "Jabberwocky," all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy.

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Willa Cather

Willa Sibert Cather (1873–1947) was an American writer who achieved recognition for her novels of frontier life on the Great Plains, including O Pioneers! (1913), The Song of the Lark (1915), and My Ántonia (1918). In 1923 she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for One of Ours.

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Kate Chopin

Kate Chopin was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1850, and moved to Louisiana in 1870 after her marriage. When her husband died in 1882, she and her children returned to St. Louis, where she started writing. The author of two novels and more than a hundred short stories, Chopin was one of the most well-known writers of her time. Her writing fell out of vogue after her death in 1904, but during the mid-twentieth century, her work experienced a revival, and is now considered a precursor to modern feminist literature.

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets.

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Stephen Crane

Stephen Crane was an American author. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

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Charles Dickens

Born on February 7, 1812, Charles Dickens is one of the most popular literary authors of all time. After a very tumultuous childhood, Dickens finally succeeded in getting his first story in a London periodical. As the number of his published works increased, so did his fame. Although he died in 1870, Dickens works are some of the most famous written works in the English language.

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Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson (1830–1886) was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life, but today is considered to be one of the most influential poets in American history.

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Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky is considered one of the greatest novelists of all time. Born in Moscow in 1821, he began adulthood by resigning a commission as a military engineer to embark on a writing career. The praise he earned for his first novel, Poor Folk, immediately vaulted him to literary stardom. His political activity led to imprisonment, a mock execution, and exile to a Siberian prison camp, all of which shaped his later novels. Since his death in 1881, he has been best remembered for his novels Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov.

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Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass (c. February 1818 – February 20, 1895) was an African American social reformer, orator, writer and statesman. After escaping from slavery, he became a leader of the abolitionist movement, gaining note for his dazzling oratory and incisive antislavery writing.

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, historical novels, plays and romances, poetry, and non-fiction.

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Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas (July 24, 1802 – December 5, 1870) was a French writer, best known for his historical novels of  adventure. Many of his novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo, was originally serialized. He also wrote plays and magazine articles and was a prolific correspondent.

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Editors of Canterbury Classics

Canterbury Classics is an imprint of Printers Row Publishing Group, a wholly owned subsidiary of Readerlink Distribution Services, LLC, the largest full-service book distributor to non-trade booksellers in North America. Canterbury Classics publishes classic works of literature in fresh, modern formats. From elegant leather-bound editions to whimsical pop-up books to the best-selling Word Cloud Classics series and more, our extensive collection is sure to captivate and inspire readers and brighten bookshelves.

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Gustave Flaubert

Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. He is known especially for his first published novel, Madame Bovary and for his scrupulous devotion to his art and style.

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Founding Fathers

The American Founding Fathers were the politicians, statesmen, and key figures who participated in the American Revolution and drafting of the country's crucial documents, thereby establishing the United States of America in the late 18th century.

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Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin is one of the most celebrated Founding Fathers of the United States. Born in Boston in 1706, he later moved to Philadelphia, where he rose to prominence as a printer, writer, inventor, scientist, entrepreneur, and statesman. He is best known for helping to draft both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States; his other accomplishments include negotiating the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which ended the Revolutionary War; publishing Poor Richard’s Almanack; and creating the first American lending library. He died in 1790, though his wit and wisdom—along with many of his inventions, such as bifocals and the Franklin stove—survive to this day.

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Zane Grey

Zane Grey (1872–1939) was one of the United States' most popular writers of western fiction. His best-selling book was Riders of the Purple Sage, published in 1912.

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Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm

Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm collected and published Germanic and European folk and fairy tales during the early to mid 19th century. Some of the world’s most classic and beloved stories have been published by them, including “Rumplestiltskin,” “Snow White,” “Sleeping Beauty,” “Rapunzel,” “Cinderella,” “Hansel and Gretel,” and many more.

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Brothers Grimm

The Brothers Grimm were German academics, linguists, cultural researchers, and authors who together collected folklore. They are among the most well-known storytellers of European folk tales.

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Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton was born in the British West Indies in either 1755 or 1757 and educated in New York. When the Revolutionary War broke out, he joined a Patriot militia, and quickly became an aide and adviser to General George Washington. After the war’s end, Hamilton authored the majority of The Federalist (later called The Federalist Papers), playing a pivotal role in ensuring ratification of the new United States Constitution. Washington later appointed Hamilton the first United States Secretary of the Treasury, where he created the U.S. Mint. Hamilton died in 1804, after being shot by Aaron Burr in their now-infamous duel.

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Homer

Homer is a legendary ancient Greek poet, traditionally said to be the author of the two great epics of Greek history: the Iliad and the Odyssey. Both books are considered landmarks in human literature, and Homer is therefore often cited as the starting point of Western literary and historical tradition.

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Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo (1802-1885), novelist, poet, and dramatist, is one of the most important of French Romantic writers. Among his best-known works are The Hunchback of Notre Dame(1831) and Les Miserables(1862).

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Washington Irving

Washington Irving was an American author, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century.

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John Keats

John Keats (1795–1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his work having been in publication for only four years before his death.

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D.H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence (September 11, 1885 – March 2, 1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic, and painter.

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Gaston Leroux

Gaston Leroux was a French journalist and playwright. Born in Paris in 1868, he abandoned a law career to become a court reporter and theater critic; as an international correspondent, he witnessed and covered the 1905 Russian Revolution. Two years later, Leroux left journalism to focus on writing fiction. He authored dozens of novels and short stories, and is considered one of the preeminent French writers of detective fiction. His most famous work, The Phantom of the Opera, was originally serialized in 1909 and 1910. He died in 1927.
 

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Jack London

John Griffith "Jack" London was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and to amass a vast fortune from his fiction alone. His most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang.

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H. P. Lovecraft

H. P. Lovecraft was an American author of horror, fantasy, and science fiction, especially the subgenre known as weird fiction.

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Niccolò Machiavelli

Niccolo Machiavelli (3 May 1469 – 21 June 1527) was an Italian historian, politician, diplomat, philosopher, humanist and writer based in Florence during the Renaissance.

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Herman Melville

Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American writer best known for the novel Moby-Dick. His first three books gained much contemporary attention, but after a fast-blooming literary success in the late 1840s, his popularity declined precipitously in the mid-1850s and never recovered during his lifetime.

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Solomon Northup

Solomon Northup was a free man kidnapped into slavery in 1851. The details of his life after the publication of his acclaimed memoir are unknown.

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Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine was an English-American political activist, author, political theorist and revolutionary.

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Howard Pyle

The work of American illustrator and author Howard Pyle (1853–1911) has appeared in more than 3,500 publications, and in his lifetime, he became one of the country's most famous illustrators. On his death in 1911, the New York Times called Pyle "the father of American magazine illustration as it is known to-day." He is best known for his 1883 novel, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood.

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William Shakespeare

Born in 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England, William Shakespeare is widely regarded as the greatest writer and playwright in the English language. In 1594 he founded the acting company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later the King's Men, in London. He died in 1616.

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Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is regarded by critics as one of the finest lyric poets in the English language.

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Robert Louis Stevenson

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) is a well-respected Scottish writer. With a propensity towards imaginative thought and rebellious philosophies, Stevenson traveled throughout the world during his life, using his experiences in much of his writing. His two best-known stories, Treasure Island and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are classics of Western literature

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Bram Stoker

Irish novelist Bram Stoker was born in 1847 and died in 1912. Although he authored numerous short stories, novels, and non-fiction works, Stoker is best known for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula.

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Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) was a depiction of life for African-Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was born in Litchfield, CT.

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Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist.

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Leo Tolstoy

Leo Tolstoy, or Count Lyev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 – November 20, 1910), was a Russian author, essayist, and philosopher whose contributions include two of the greatest literary masterpieces of all time, War and Peace, and Anna Karenina.

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Mark Twain

Born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, Mark Twain is arguably the best-known American author. Most celebrated for his witty and satirical writing, Twain was also very well-known during his lifetime for his oratory and storytelling skills. Twain passed away in April 1910.

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Sun Tzu

Sun Tzu (544 B.C.–496 B.C.) was an ancient Chinese military general, strategist, and philosopher from the Zhou Dynasty, who has had a significant impact on Chinese and Asian history and culture, both as an author of The Art of War as well as through legend.

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Jules Verne

French writer Jules Verne (February 8, 1828 - March 24, 1905) pioneered the science fiction literary genre. He published many plays, essays, short stories, and poems during his lifetime, but is best known for Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Around the World in 80 Days, and A Journey to the Center of the Earth. Today, he is one of the most translated authors in the world.

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Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer.

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Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman (1819–1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. He was part of the humanist movement, and his work was controversial in its time. His best-known work is Leaves of Grass.

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Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish writer and poet, who became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s.

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William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads.

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Miguel de Cervantes

Miguel de Cervantes (September 29, 1547 – April 22, 1616) was a Spanish novelist, poet, and playwright. His novel, Don Quixote, was considered the first modern European novel and is a classic of Western literature.

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