Skip to Main Content

Scarlet Traces

An Anthology Based on The War of the Worlds

Edited by Ian Edginton
Published by Abaddon
Distributed by Simon & Schuster

It is the dawn of the twentieth century.

Following the Martians' failed invasion of Earth, the British Empire has seized their technology and unlocked its secrets for themselves. It is a Golden Age of discovery, adventure, culture, invention—and of domination, and rebellion.

Scarlet Traces reveals a world of ant-headed nightmares; vacuum salesmen; war machines; deadly secrets; clockwork marvels; and Sherlock Holmes, T. S. Eliot and Thomas Edison as you've never seen them before...

Including stories by Stephen Baxter, I. N. J. Culbard, Adam Roberts, Emma Beeby, James Lovegrove, Nathan Duck, Mark Morris, Dan Whitehead, Chris Roberson, Maura McHugh, Jonathan Green and Andrew Lane.

I.N.J. Culbard is an award-winning artist and writer. He has had work published by SelfMadeHero, Dark Horse comics, Vertigo and BOOM! Studios. He first started working with Ian Edginton on adaptations for SelfMadeHero of The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Hound of the Baskervilles, A Study in Scarlet, The Sign of the Four, and The Valley of Fear. He has also worked with Dan Abnett on original series such as The New Deadwardians (Vertigo), Dark Ages (Dark Horse Comics), and Wild’s End (BOOM! Studios). And lastly he has worked with Chris Lackey and Chad Fifer on the original graphic novel, Deadbeats (SelfMadeHero). He has produced a number of his own adaptations for SelfMadeHero including The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, The Shadow Out of Time, The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, At the Mountains of Madness and his first solo original graphic novel, Celeste.

Emma Beeby had established herself as a professional writer in the film and games industries before moving into the comics arena. The first woman to write Judge Dredd, she has also worked on several other strips for 2000 AD, including Judge Anderson, The Alienist and Survival Geeks (co-creating the latter two strips with frequent writing partner Gordon Rennie). Outside of the Galaxy’s Greatest Comic, she co-created (again with Rennie) the award-winning graphic novel Robbie Burns: Witch Hunter, and has co-written a Doctor Who series for Titan Comics.

James Lovegrove is the author of nearly 60 books, including the New York Times bestselling Pantheon series, the Redlaw novels and the Dev Harmer Missions. He has produced five Sherlock Holmes novels and a Conan Doyle/Lovecraft mashup trilogy, The Cthulhu Casebooks. He has also written tie-in novels for the TV show Firefly. James has sold well over 50 short stories and published two collections, Imagined Slights and Diversifications. He has produced a dozen short books for readers with reading difficulties, and a four-volume fantasy saga for teenagers, The Clouded World, under the pseudonym Jay Amory. James has been shortlisted for numerous awards, including the Arthur C. Clarke Award, the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Bram Stoker Award, the British Fantasy Society Award and the Manchester Book Award. His short story “Carry The Moon In My Pocket” won the 2011 Seiun Award in Japan for Best Translated Short Story. His work has been translated into fifteen languages, and his journalism has appeared in periodicals as diverse as Literary Review, Interzone, BBC MindGames, All About History and Comic Heroes. He contributes a regular fiction-review column to the Financial Times and lives with his wife, two sons and tiny dog in Eastbourne.

  • Publisher: Abaddon (September 5, 2019)
  • Length: 360 pages
  • ISBN13: 9781781087466

"This is exceptional: scathing socio-political satire made sweet by being British speculative fiction through and through." * Page 45 * "A saga over a decade in the making" * Comicon.com * "A series that increases its dramatic and imaginative scope with every step. It's clever, accessible, scary, thought-provoking and thrilling, all wrapped up in a beautiful package" * Grovel.org.uk * "a showcase for D'Israeli's art, every face a moment of peace or panic in a vividly identifiable style, traditional in its framing but radically expressive in the figurework. It's a very productive friction, beefing up a robust science-fiction air for the Wells adaptation and emphasising the physical impact of Martian war machines, laying waste to pastoral Surrey and ingesting plenty of the population." * Tripwire (On Scarlet Traces comics) * 'A vivid and exciting version of the original story combined with a wonderful sequel' * Starburst Magazine * 'A uniquely strange and absorbing body of work' * AV Club (on Scarlet Traces comic) *