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Anne of Green Gables

When Anne Shirley arrives at Green Gables, she surprises everyone: first of all, she's a girl, even though Marilla Cuthbert and her brother Matthew specifically asked for an orphan boy to help around the farm. And second of all, she's not just any girl: she has bright red hair, a wild imagination, and can talk a mile a minute.

But she also has a sweet disposition and quick wit, and Anne (with an "e" of course-it's so much more distinguished!) soon finds her place in Avonlea, making a friend in her neighbor Diana Barry and attending the local school, where she spurns the advances of the popular and handsome Gilbert Blythe when he commits the ultimate sin of making fun of her hair.

Anne has a temper as fiery as her hair and a knack for finding trouble, and she also has a big heart and a positive attitude that affects everyone she meets. This classic and beloved story makes a wonderful gift and keepsake.
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About the Authors

L. Frank Baum

Lyman Frank Baum was born in Chittenango, New York, on May 15, 1856. Over the course of his life, Baum raised fancy poultry, sold fireworks, managed an opera house, opened a department store, and an edited a newspaper before finally turning to writing. In 1900, he published his best known book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Eventually he wrote fifty-five novels, including thirteen Oz books, plus four “lost” novels, eighty-three short stories, more than two hundred poems, an unknown number of scripts, and many miscellaneous writings. Baum died on May 6, 1919. He is buried in the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Cemetery, in Glendale, California.

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Frances Hodgson Burnett

Frances Hodgson Burnett (1849-1924) was born in Manchester, England, but moved to America as a teenager. Little Lord Fauntleroy was published in 1886 and was dramatized during Burnett's lifetime. The story lives on today in videos and movies. Though she began writing novels for adults, she gained lasting success writing for children. She is best known for Little Lord Fauntleroy, A Little Princess (1905), and The Secret Garden (1911).

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Lewis Carroll

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, and photographer. He is especially remembered for bringing to life the beloved and long-revered tale of Alice in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass (1871).

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Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens is one of the world's most revered novelists, and certainly the writer most associated with the Christmas season.

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L. M. Montgomery

Lucy Maud Montgomery (November 30, 1874–April 24, 1942) publicly known as L.M. Montgomery, was a Canadian author best known for a series of novels beginning with Anne of Green Gables, published in 1908. Anne of Green Gables was an immediate success. The central character, Anne, an orphaned girl, made Montgomery famous in her lifetime and gave her an international following. The first novel was followed by a series of sequels. Montgomery went on to publish twenty novels as well as 500 short stories and poems. Because many of the novels were set on Prince Edward Island, Canada and the Canadian province became literary landmarks. She was awarded Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935.

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Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was an American writer, poet, and critic.  Best known for his macabre prose work, including the short story “The Tell-Tale Heart,” his writing has influenced literature in the United States and around the world.

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Anna Sewell

Anna Sewell, an English Quaker, (1820-1878), wrote only one novel in her lifetime, Black Beauty.

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Margaret Sidney

Margaret Sidney's real name was Harriett Stone (1844-1924). She was born in Connecticut and authored twelve books about the Pepper clan. She is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Massachusetts.

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Mark Twain

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens. His humorous tales of human nature, especially The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884), remain standard texts in high school and college literature classes. Twain was born and died in years in which Halley’s Comet passed by Earth: 1835 and 1910.

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Jules Verne

Jules Verne (1828-1905) was born in France. Around the World in Eighty Days has long been his most popular novel. Verne is credited with creating the genre of science fiction with such other works as Journey to the Center of the Earth and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.

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Kate Douglas Wiggin

Kate Douglas Wiggin (September 28, 1856­–August 24, 1923) was an American educator and author of children’s stories, most notably the classic children’s novel Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. She devoted her adult life to the welfare of children and worked closely with her sister, Nora A. Smith.

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Johann David Wyss

Johann David Wyss (1743­1818) was a Swiss pastor. The Swiss Family Robinson was edited by his son Johann Rudolf Wyss, a scholar who wrote the Swiss national anthem.

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